Make your own free website on Tripod.com
« September 2017 »
S M T W T F S
1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
You are not logged in. Log in
Entries by Topic
All topics  «
The Murse's Station
Friday, 6 October 2006
Texas Nurse sentanced for life.

This is just horrible. Why not just walk off & quit if you feel this way....

 

 

 

Texas nurse gets life in 10 drug deaths By ANGELA K. BROWN, Associated Press WriterThu Oct 5, 6:07 PM ET A former nurse was sentenced Thursday to life in prison on charges that she killed 10 hospital patients with drug injections because she found them too demanding.Vickie Dawn Jackson, 40, pleaded no contest on Wednesday and was sentenced after prosecutors presented their evidence to a judge.Investigators believe Jackson injected the patients through their intravenous lines with a drug normally used to temporarily stop breathing when doctors insert a breathing tube.FBI agent David Burns testified that the patients had been hospitalized for minor ailments — including a foot sore, diarrhea or dementia — and were about to be released."In general, they were the kind of patients who needed more care," Burns said at the sentencing. "I think that's probably why. They're verbose. They want this. They're thirsty. It seemed to make her angry."Authorities became suspicious after nearly two dozen deaths were reported at Nocona General Hospital in late 2000 and early 2001, a stretch of time when the hospital should have seen only five to 10 deaths.Authorities discovered at least 20 vials of the drug were missing. And officers searching garbage at Jackson's home found a syringe that contained traces of it, Burns said.Jackson's attorney, Bruce Martin, said Jackson maintained her innocence and pleaded no contest to avoid a trial so her daughter would not be called to testify.In a statement issued through her attorney, Jackson said she was "sympathetic to the families of the deceased" and "acutely aware that closure for them is necessary, if, indeed, closure can ever come for them."John Fitch, whose grandmother Dorothy Vanderburg was 79 when she died, said Jackson had taken "the easy way out.""I wonder if this is your twisted way of thumbing your nose at those of us you have hurt," Fitch said in court. "May (God) have mercy on your soul."Prosecutors did not seek the death penalty, meaning Jackson would have been sentenced to life in prison if convicted by a jury.The case was moved from Nocona, 90 miles northwest of Dallas, to this West Texas town because of publicity surrounding the deaths.  

Posted by rswilson70 at 9:42 AM EDT
Monday, 4 September 2006
Mysterious Creature Washed Up on Beach

 

This creature was found by Russian soldiers on Sakhalin shoreline. Sakhalin area is situated near to Japan, it’s the most eastern part of Russia, almost 5000 miles to East from Moscow (Russia is huge). People don’t know who is it. According to the bones and teeth - it is not a fish. According to its skeleton - it’s not a crocodile or alligator. It has a skin with hair or fur. It has been said that it was taken by Russian special services for in-depth studies, and we are lucky that people who encountered it first made those photos before it was brought away.        

http://englishrussia.com/?p=251

 

From museumofhoaxes.com….

Mysterious Creature Washed Up on BeachStatus: MisidentifiedI received links to two different pages featuring a series of pictures showing what is described as a 'monster' and an 'unknown creature'.

On one of the sites, this description is given:This creature was found by Russian soldiers on Sakhalin shoreline. Sakhalin area is situated near to Japan, it’s the most eastern part of Russia, almost 5000 miles to East from Moscow (Russia is huge). People don’t know who is it. According to the bones and teeth - it is not a fish. According to its skeleton - it’s not a crocodile or alligator. It has a skin with hair or fur. It has been said that it was taken by Russian special services for in-depth studies, and we are lucky that people who encountered it first made those photos before it was brought away.
Ignoring the unverified description, I'm fairly sure it's a beluga whale.
A site describes them as: "... a small white whale measuring 9 to 15 feet in length (Seems about right, sizewise). Belugas are found throughout the Arctic Ocean and in a few other isolated populations. Belugas were once heavily hunted for their meat, hide (for leather) and oil.

(Thanks to Sarah and Gerrit for the links, and Charybdis for his excellent googling skills.) Posted By: Flora | Date: Mon Aug 28, 2006 | Permalink | Comments (13)
Category: Animals, Photos/Videos

Beluga Whale Skull... link to skull photo


Posted by rswilson70 at 2:45 PM EDT
In Memory

Stephen Robert "Crocodile Hunter" Irwin (22 February 19624 September 2006)

 


Posted by rswilson70 at 11:39 AM EDT
Steve 'Crocodile Hunter' Irwin Killed by Stingray Off Aussie Coast

Steve 'Crocodile Hunter' Irwin Killed by Stingray Off Aussie Coast; Barb Pierces Heart While Filming 'Ocean's Dealiest'

By Underwatertimes.com News Service

The larger-than-life Irwin, 44, was known for his fearless handling of the deadliest wildlife

Cairns, Australia (2006-09-04 09:16:06 EST) Steve Irwin, the hugely popular Australian television personality and conservationist known as the “Crocodile Hunter,” was killed Monday by a stingray while filming off the Great Barrier Reef. He was 44.

Irwin was at Batt Reef, off the remote coast of northeastern Queensland state, shooting a segment for a series called “Ocean’s Deadliest” when he swam too close to one of the animals, which have a poisonous bard on their tails, his friend and colleague John Stainton said.

“He came on top of the stingray and the stingray’s barb went up and into his chest and put a hole into his heart,” said Stainton, who was on board Irwin’s boat at the time.

Crew members aboard the boat, Croc One, called emergency services in the nearest city, Cairns, and administered CPR as they rushed the boat to nearby Low Isle to meet a rescue helicopter. Medical staff pronounced Irwin dead when they arrived a short time later, Stainton said.

Irwin was famous for his enthusiasm for wildlife and his catchword “Crikey!” in his television program “Crocodile Hunter.” First broadcast in Australia in 1992, the program was picked up by the Discovery network, catapulting Irwin to international celebrity.

He rode his image into a feature film, 2002’s “The Crocodile Hunters: Collision Course” and developed the wildlife park that his parents opened, Australia Zoo, into a major tourist attraction.

“The world has lost a great wildlife icon, a passionate conservationist and one of the proudest dads on the planet,” Stainton told reporters in Cairns. “He died doing what he loved best and left this world in a happy and peaceful state of mind. He would have said, ’Crocs Rule!”’

'A huge loss to Australia' Prime Minister John Howard, who hand-picked Irwin to attend a gala barbecue to honor President Bush when he visited in 2003, said he was “shocked and distressed at Steve Irwin’s sudden, untimely and freakish death.”

“It’s a huge loss to Australia,” Howard told reporters. “He was a wonderful character. He was a passionate environmentalist. He brought joy and entertainment and excitement to millions of people.”

Irwin, who made a trademark of hovering dangerously close to untethered crocodiles and leaping on their backs, spoke in rapid-fire bursts with a thick Australian accent and was almost never seen without his uniform of khaki shorts and shirt and heavy boots.

His ebullience was infectious and Australian officials sought him out for photo opportunities and to promote Australia internationally.

Irwin’s public image was dented, however, in 2004 when he caused an uproar by holding his infant son in one arm while feeding large crocodiles inside a zoo pen. Irwin claimed at the time there was no danger to the child, and authorities declined to charge Irwin with violating safety regulations.

Later that year, he was accused of getting too close to penguins, a seal and humpback whales in Antarctica while making a documentary. Irwin denied any wrongdoing, and an Australian Environment Department investigation recommended no action be taken against him.

Stingrays have a serrated, toxin-loaded barb, or spine, on the top of their tail. The barb, which can be up to 10 inches long, flexes if a ray is frightened. Stings usually occur to people when they step on or swim too close to a ray and can be excruciatingly painful but are rarely fatal, said University of Queensland marine neuroscientist Shaun Collin.

'Extraordinarily bad luck' Collin said he suspected Irwin died because the barb pierced under his ribcage and directly into his heart.

“It was extraordinarily bad luck. It’s not easy to get spined by a stingray and to be killed by one is very rare,” Collin said.

News of Irwin’s death spread quickly, and tributes flowed from all quarters of society.

At Australia Zoo at Beerwah, south Queensland, floral tributes were dropped at the entrance, where a huge fake crocodile gapes. Drivers honked their horns as they passed.

“Steve, from all God’s creatures, thank you. Rest in peace,” was written on a card with a bouquet of native flowers.

“We’re all very shocked. I don’t know what the zoo will do without him. He’s done so much for us, the environment and it’s a big loss,” said Paula Kelly, a local resident and volunteer at the zoo, after dropping off a wreath at the gate.

Stainton said Irwin’s American-born wife Terri, from Eugene, Ore., had been informed of his death, and had told their daughter Bindi Sue, 8, and son Bob, who will turn 3 in December.

The couple met when she went on vacation in Australia in 1991 and visited Irwin’s Australia Zoo; they were married six months later. Sometimes referred to as the “Crocodile Huntress,” she costarred on her husband’s television show and in his 2002 movie.

 


Posted by rswilson70 at 9:58 AM EDT

Newer | Latest | Older